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Granuloma annulare

What is it?

Inflammatory disease of unknown cause that leads to the degeneration of collagen tissue. It is believed that may be due to an immune reaction of the organism to several agents.

It is most common in children and young women, and may be related to diabetes, especially in the case of disseminated lesions.

Characteristics and symptoms

Granuloma annulare is characterized by elevated lesions, skin colored or slightly pink, which increase in size and gain the aspect of rings, hence the name annular. These rings can be small or up to several centimeters in size, and the lesions may be single or multiple.

The aspect is not always like a ring, the lesions may appear as small elevated dots. In some cases they spread throughout the body. The most common locations are the back of the hands and feet, but can reach any region.

It is rare to occur associated symptoms, which may cause discreet pruritus (itching). The diagnosis can be confirmed by biopsy. An interesting phenomenon is that, after biopsy, the lesion may undergo spontaneous regression.

Treatment

Granuloma annulare may regress spontaneously in a few months to two years or more, depending on the length of the condition. Treatment is done with intra-lesional infiltration of corticosteroids or applied on the lesion, and should be determined by a dermatologist. In more extensive cases, oral medications may be needed.

Based on the spontaneous regression after biopsy, the realization of punctures in the lesions can also lead to their disappearance, as well as cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen.

Related articles

- Eczema nummular
- Granuloma pyogenic


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